Feeds

Sun shrinks Constellation for HPC run

Hopes to outdo Bull

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Sun Microsystems has suffered from a hate-hate relationship with the supercomputing world over the past few years. The shift to Linux clusters caught the company totally off guard, and resulted in Sun vanishing from the Top500 supercomputers list. That's hardly the "right" position for a company that prides itself on selling servers and building big systems to occupy.

Now, Sun is trying its best to creep back into the supercomputing fold. And it's having some success - at creeping.

Sun's proudest HPC moment in many years occurred this week when its Ranger system built for the Texas Advanced Computing Center popped in at number 4 on the Top500 list. The massive computer stood as just one of four total Sun-based systems on the list. Meanwhile, IBM and HP have hundreds of systems on the Top500.

Sun's looking to take the "Constellation" gear at the heart of Ranger and shrink it down so that more companies can buy into the HPC play, which includes Sun's servers, storage boxes and switches.

So, customers will now see a 72-port Datacenter Switch, which is a much scaled down version of the 3,456-port Datacenter Switch used with Ranger. The 1U unit was previewed last November, meaning that Sun has, as usual, taken its sweet time to get the part out the door.

Also new to Sun's lineup is the Sun Blade X6450, which holds dual- and quad-core Xeon chips. Combine that server with the new switch, and you can get 7.37 Teraflops of computing power in a rack.

Out of all the major hardware vendors, Sun remains the one closest to being a pure play server shop, so it's always a bit confusing to see it trail rivals by a wide margin with things like HPC systems or blades. It's been working at improving HPC systems for a number of years and has enjoyed a couple of big wins. That said, we'd expect Sun to have way more supercomputers at this point than, say, SGI or Bull, but no such luck.

Perhaps the mini-Constellation will change Sun's fortunes . . .®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
Cray-cray Met Office spaffs £97m on VERY AVERAGE HPC box
Only 250th most powerful in the world? Bring back Michael Fish
Microsoft brings the CLOUD that GOES ON FOREVER
Sky's the limit with unrestricted space in the cloud
'ANYTHING BUT STABLE' Netflix suffers BIG Europe-wide outage
Friday night LIVE? Nope. The only thing streaming are tears down my face
IBM, backing away from hardware? NEVER!
Don't be so sure, so-surers
Google roolz! Nest buys Revolv, KILLS new sales of home hub
Take my temperature, I'm feeling a little bit dizzy
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.