Feeds

IBM's Roadrunner is top of the supercomputer pops

Going faster miles an hour

Intelligent flash storage arrays

So IBM beat IBM in the new supercomputer TOP500 hit parade published today. No surprise there, with Roadrunner, the new no.1, built by IBM for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, earning plenty of airtime last week for being the first petaflop computer.

Reduced to no.2 is IBM's BlueGene/L (478.2 teraflop/s) at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It had a very long run at pole position, ranking no.1 since November 2004.

IBM at the top and thereabouts is the normal scheme of things in the TOP500 list. Upsetting the natural order, is a new entry at number 4, the University of Texas's Ranger (326 teraflop/s) system built by Sun. It's been a long time since Sun has ranked so prominently. But then this time around it's a topsy-turvy TOP500, with the compilers noting "the largest turnover rate in [its] 16-year history". The last system on the list, they say "would have been listed at position 200 in the previous TOP500 just six months ago".

What else? Intel-powered systems grew in dominance, now featuring in 75 per cent of installations, up from 70 per cent in November. Quad core processors are flooding the supercomputer world, with 283 systems using them.

The US is the daddy of the supercomputing world (257 installations), with Europe (184 ) and Asia (48) lagging far behind. US vendors also dominate. IBM has most entries - 210 systems (42 per cent) - over Hewlett Packard with 183 systems (36.6 per cent). Dell (5.4), SGI (4.4) and Cray (3.2) bring up the rear.

By system count, HP is increasing market share. Six months ago it had 166 systems, while IBM had 232 systems. When it comes to performance, IBM is streets ahead. Someone else can do the maths, but IBM's Roadrunner no doubt helped the company increase its lead by this measure to 48 per cent of installed total performance (up from 45). HP eased a little to 22.4 per cent, down from 23 per cent last time around.

TOP500 compilers have introduced a new metric with today's rankings - energy efficiency. This is very modish, but we suspect that governments relying on compute power for nuclear bomb simulations, say, are unfussed with the electricity bill that their taxpayers must bankroll. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
IBM, backing away from hardware? NEVER!
Don't be so sure, so-surers
Hey - who wants 4.8 TERABYTES almost AS FAST AS MEMORY?
China's Memblaze says they've got it in PCIe. Yow
Microsoft brings the CLOUD that GOES ON FOREVER
Sky's the limit with unrestricted space in the cloud
This time it's SO REAL: Overcoming the open-source orgasm myth with TODO
If the web giants need it to work, hey, maybe it'll work
'ANYTHING BUT STABLE' Netflix suffers BIG Europe-wide outage
Friday night LIVE? Nope. The only thing streaming are tears down my face
Google roolz! Nest buys Revolv, KILLS new sales of home hub
Take my temperature, I'm feeling a little bit dizzy
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.