Sweden ushers in bugging for all

Amended bill voted through

Sweden this evening voted in favour of its controversial snoop law, after the proposal was amended earlier today.

Under the new law, all communication across Swedish borders will be tapped, and information can also be traded with international security agencies, such as America's National Security Agency.

A total of 143 members of parliament voted to pass the bill into law, with 138 delegates opposed.

Earlier today, prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt failed to win the backing of his four-party coalition: the draft was sent back to the committee for revision. Key members of parliament who were likely to vote against the proposition were put under pressure by their parties, according to some reports.

Despite receiving copies of George Orwell's book 1984 from protesters earlier this week, MPs from Sweden's ruling party believe the law does not constitute the final nail in the coffin of democracy.

The amended law includes the creation of an agency to control the granting of permissions. The Swedish Data Inspection Board is to monitor the surveillance activities of the National Defence Radio Establishment.

An external group comprising members appointed by the government will monitor privacy and integrity issues. ®

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