Feeds

Intel quad-core Xeon server virtualization score booted by VMware

Opteron box now top of the VMmark heap

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

AMD's quad-core Opteron chip has silently topped Intel's similarly endowed Xeon processor as the leader of VMware's server virtualization performance benchmark.

The usurping, however, isn't a result of a new system or chip. The Intel-based system that was formally king of the VMmark 16-core server scores has been disqualified.

Dell's submission of its 4-socket PowerEdge R900, published May 2008, was unceremoniously heaved last week due to the results not being "in compliance with the VMmark run and reporting rules."

"Specifically, this result used a configuration that was not fully disclosed...," the withdrawn result now cites. VMware adds it has updated its rules to clarify what types of optimization is permitted before running the benchmark.

Previously, the Intel-based R900 led the 4-socket benchmarks with a VMmark score of 14.23@10 tiles. The AMD-based R905 was second with a score of 14.17@10 tiles. Third was the IBM System x3850 with 13.16@9 tiles.

The new top system is now the AMD-based PowerEdge R905, which had the system score submitted by Dell at the same time as a refreshed R900. An older benchmark of the Intel-based R900 is now relegated to the number four spot.

Intel tells us it believes the withdrawal was a result of a technicality — and justifiably notes it was Dell which submitted the benchmark in the first place. VMware meanwhile is playing the change as an exercise for its benchmarking guidelines. We haven't heard back from Dell.

So will Intel update its Xeon virtualization performance page on its website to reflect the disqualification?

Probably not any time soon. You see, Intel has been pretty comfortable living in a convenient fragment of time/space on its site and even with some advertising:

Hey wait a minute — that a quad-core Xeon versus a dual-core Opteron!

To be fair, it could be as innocent as laziness in the marketing department. Intel did have to wait a good six months before the quad-core Opterons were out in the wild for comparisons. Maybe the guy in charge of the charts silently passed away in his cubicle without anyone noticing.

Or maybe our Sherlock Holmes caps are covered in tinfoil for a good reason. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
No biggie: EMC's XtremIO firmware upgrade 'will wipe data'
But it'll have no impact and will be seamless, we're told
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.