Feeds

Eclipse projects squeeze into record Summer fun pack

Refined but bloated

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Older projects will also see new features both to improve usability and to bring them into line with Eclipse 3.4.

Version 2.3 of Business Intelligence Reporting Tools (BIRT) gets improved support for JavaScript and a bunch of usability improvements such as easier formatting, crosstab enhancements and prototype integration of DTP graphical query.

Version 5.0 of C/C++ Development Tools (CDT) benefits from a bunch of usability improvements and a new refactoring engine.

The latest version of the Dynamic Languages Tool Kit (DLTK), which first appeared in last year's Europa release, includes support for Ruby and Tcl - but Python and JavaScript users will have to wait for later releases.

Various components of the Device Software Developer Platform (DSDP) have been upgraded, with changes including a first glimpse of the DSDP Native Application Builder (NAB) and support for embedded applications development.

The Graphical Editing Framework (GEF) release 3.4 gets a redesigned user interface and support for the Eclipse Visualization Toolkit.

Upgrades to Eclipse's Modeling Development Tools (MDT), meanwhile, are aimed at improving usability. The Ganymede release includes a range of upgrades for the Test and Performance Tools Platform (TPTP) with support for Java 1.6 and for parallel test suite execution.

Finally, version 3.0 of the Web Tools Platform (WTP) boosts Eclipse's support for Java and JavaScript with a lengthy list of new options to support Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) and Enterprise Java Beans (EJB).

All eyes on 2010

As you can see, there's something for everyone here. Eclipse is generally helping individuals and ISVs that rely on multiple projects for their work, by providing a co-ordinated release that irons out bugs and ensures timely - rather than staggered - releases. That's a good thing.

We can probably look forward to next summer's version update adding yet more projects to the mix. All eyes, though, will be on 2010 with version 4.0, which will see how far Eclipse is willing to go in either trimming things back, cleaning up or going modular. In the meantime, you'll have to content yourself with general usability improvements but a growing code base.®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit
And at the back of the field, Windows 8.1 is sprinting away from Windows 8
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?