Feeds

Windows Server 2008 cuts power costs, claims Microsoft

Compared to Windows Server 2003 that is

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Microsoft spat out a white paper earlier this week in which it claimed that its Windows Server 2008 product cuts power consumption by about 10 per cent.

It’s no surprise to see Redmond leaping at the opportunity to proclaim that its new software can help cut customer’s increasingly hefty 'leccy bills. But how did it draw those conclusions? Why, by testing Windows Server 2008 against Windows Server 2003, of course.

The firm compared power consumption between two installations on the same server, but tellingly it didn’t test its software against any Linux-based offerings or rival virtualisation products on the market.

Microsoft bods installed Windows Server 2003 R2 Enterprise x64 Edition with Service Pack two as well as hot fixes onto a system with two dual-core processors and 4GB of RAM. They then formatted the hard drive before loading the server with Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition.

They concluded that Windows Server 2003 guzzled 10 per cent more power that Windows Server 2008.

Two significant changes set the platforms apart, said Microsoft. The first being better power management features that have been enabled by default in Server 2008, while the second was all about the dirty virtuous V-word.

Virtualisation is a major component of Windows Server 2008 which was released late February this year. Microsoft stated the obvious about the technology’s benefits:

“If multiple virtual machines can run on a single physical machine without consuming significantly more power than a standalone server while keeping comparable throughput, that means you can add virtual machines at essentially no power cost, as dictated by your hardware and performance needs.”

Microsoft even took the opportunity to put the boot in to its rivals. “Hyper-V can still throttle the amount of voltage to the CPU based on load – which is something VMware and Xen can NOT do today,” it said.

However, most significant of all is the fact that Hyper-V hasn’t landed yet. The software giant was forced to delay the product’s scheduled arrival, which should have been neatly tied-up with Windows Server 2008 at its Heroes Happen Here launch earlier this year.

Microsoft still insists that it's on schedule to pump out a full final version of Hyper-V by mid-August.

In the meantime, customers can play with release candidate versions of the hypervisor to test Redmond's 10 per cent Windows Server 2008 power saving claims. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'
Public IaaS... something's gotta give - and it may be AWS
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
BT claims almost-gigabit connections over COPPER WIRE
Just need to bring the fibre box within 19m ...
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.