Feeds

Symantec tools up with Xen for VMware assault

Storage management with a server virtualization twist

Security for virtualized datacentres

Symantec Vision '08 Symantec is teaming up with Citrix to attack the server virtualization market. The storage management firm has stirred Citrix's Xen code into its Veritas suite in a new offering arriving later in 2008.

CEO John Thompson introduced Veritas Virtual Infrastructure (VVI) today during his opening keynote at the Symantec Vision conference at Las Vegas.

"It's the first solution that solves the problem of managing storage for highly dynamic x86 virtual server environment," he said.

John Thompson

VVI basically puts Citrix's XenServer hypervisor into the Symantec Storage Foundation software administration interface. That's the opposite of what we were told a year ago to expect from the Xen/Symantec alliance.

Last July, a pre-acquisition Xen said it was putting Symantec's storage management code into the hypervisor interface. That idea died a death. But Symantec was still keen to work Citrix to take a bite out of the VMware virtualization lead — and through it, Symantec's storage management rival, EMC.

Here's the angle: VVI will, Symantec's storage boss Rob Soderbery says, be preferred over VMware's Virtual Machine File System (VMFS) because customers can manage a virtual stack the exact same way they manage a physical stack. He said most large companies are more comfortable with block-based storage, something VMFS sorely lacks.

VVI allows direct control of block storage from a guest virtual server. Soderbery claims this will make companies more willing to transition into a virtual environment.

Features from the XenServer side of things include sharing boot images across multiple virtual servers and load balancing.

Despite giving Citrix a major nod over VMware, Thompson emphasized the company's supposed platform neutrality.

"Moving forward, as the virtualization market becomes more heterogeneous, we're committed to supporting a number of hypervisors — VMware, Citrix XenServer, and Microsoft Hyper-V," said Thompson.

Veritas Virtual Infrastructure is available this fall starting at $4,595 for a two-socket server. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.