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Intel has been fined $25m (26bn Won) by the South Korean Fair Trade commission for breaching fair trade rules.

The chipmaker was found guilty of offering unfair subsidies to Samsung and Trigem Computer Inc if they promised to only buy Intel chips and froze out rival AMD.

But Intel dismissed the charges. Bruce Sewell, Intel general counsel, said the company was disappointed and "completely disagreed" with the verdict. The company is considering appealing the decision. Sewell said he did not feel regulators took full account of the evidence the chip giant offered.

Intel faces similar accusations in Europe where the European Commission is investigating the company's relationship with retailers. Back in February Competition Commission officials raided Intel and Dixons Store Group offices in Germany and the UK looking for evidence of unfair practises.

New York's Attorney General Andrew Cuomo is also investigating Intel, as well as AMD, over how they price their chips and how their chip exclusivity agreements with partners work. ®

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