Feeds

Indian gov: Let us into BlackBerry or we'll shut you down

RIM reluctant to offer up backdoor

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The Indian government has tightened the screw on Canadian push-email pioneer Research In Motion (RIM) in the ongoing dispute over official interception of BlackBerry email. Reports now indicate that if RIM won't open up its encypted messaging to Indian spooks, it won't be permitted to do business in the subcontinent.

According to India's Economic Times, a meeting was held last Thursday in New Delhi between RIM representatives, the Canadian High Commission and officials from the Department of Telecoms.

“We had a meeting [with the DoT] today. It was positive. The talks will continue,” a RIM spokesman told the Economic Times. However, the paper's sources indicated that the government has become increasingly impatient with the company's argument that it is unable to provide intercept facilities to Indian law-enforcement and intelligence personnel. Western governments are widely believed to enjoy such access.

According to many industry experts, however, the simplest means of intercepting BlackBerry encrypted email en masse involves having access to one of RIM's email servers, at present located in the US and UK. It appears that RIM may be unwilling to bear the cost of putting more servers in India, and is understandably reluctant to give India remote access to existing installations. Furthermore, it is feared that other governments might then demand the same level of access.

“RIM does not want to bear this cost. Ditto with service providers who offer BlackBerry services," an unnamed industry figure told the Economic Times.

"RIM feels that if it accepts the demands of the Indian government, it will set a precedent as other countries may demand a similar arrangement,” added the source.

Negotiations continue. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.