Feeds

Europe agrees on exchange of criminal records

Common market for crims

Security for virtualized datacentres

The European Commission has adopted proposals to make it easier for police to check criminal records in other European countries.

The European Criminal Records Information System will set out the technical specifications so that police can get easy-to-use records from forces in other countries.

Jacques Barrot, commissioner for Justice Freedom and Security, said: "Information about previous conviction[s] shall circulate between judges and prosecutors as well as police authorities. This is essential in order to provide adequate responses to crime but also to prevent new crimes from being committed."

Criminal records will only be stored on national databases not on a European-wide megadatabase. The Commission aims to create interconnection software by the beginning of next year.

The information is needed in order for police to carry out effective criminal record checks for people working with children or other vulnerable groups. Courts need to the information so they can sentence people on the basis of all their past convictions.

How much difference it will make in practice is open to question.

The British government has failed on several occasions to deal with the criminal records it does receive from police forces across Europe. In January last year it emerged that 500 people convicted of serious offences across Europe had not had their UK criminal records updated. The files got as far as the Home Office but were not entered onto the Police National Computer. Last month the Crown Prosecution Service apologised for losing a disc containing DNA profiles from over 2,000 crime scenes in the Netherlands.

The idea has been making progress in Brussels for some time, although previous initiatives under the Treaty of Prum were criticised by European data protection bodies.

Data protection groups are currently considering the latest proposals.®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.