Feeds

Want to buy Jacqui Smith's ID?

Stupid plan shown to be stupid

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Four people have been arrested after the BBC bought a driving licence and utility bills in the name of Home Secretary Jacqui Smith.

The Beeb has spent the last three months investigating one of the many websites which sell identity documents. It bought a driving licence, a gas bill and a bank statement in Jacqui Smith's name.

Identity experts said the quality of the documents was disturbing and they were more than good enough to commit further ID theft.

The Government, rather missing the point, said the ease with which the documents were obtained showed why we need a national ID card because: "ID cards will tie your fingerprints to your biographical details, cracking down on fraud, and creating a single, secure proof of identity."

A Home Office spokeswoman said extra police would help: "To support enforcement of the law we have committed £29m to tackling fraud, including establishing the City of London Police as the national lead on fraud. In the first six months of operation, forces across the country have used new laws to prosecute more than 500 identity crimes."

Guy Herbert, from campaigners No2ID, said the story in fact showed the foolishness of putting all our identifying facts in one database.

Herbert said: "The Government has been warned time and again by experts that its megalomaniac desire to stack every personal fact about everyone in Britain onto a Home Office hard disc is madness. It carries on with its eyes shut and its ears stopped.

"Who but a minister could fail to grasp that, far from preventing fraud, nationalising identity will make the consequences of 'identity theft' far worse."

The full rollout of the ID card scheme has been delayed until 2012. The Tory party has promised to cancel the project if it is elected, although they would likely have to compensate the technology providers in order to terminate the contracts. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.