Feeds

HP launches siamese-twin server blade

Because two CPUs are denser than one

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Hewlett-Packard has devised a siamese-twin CPU server blade for those monstrous data centers with nowhere to spread out.

HP pitches its new ProLiant BL2x220c G5 as the first blade with two independent servers combined into a single blade enclosure. The twofer is intended for large "scale-out" operations that require massive computing power, but have limited floor space or don't want to pony up to build a new site. That covers the entire Web 2.0, cloud, and high performance computing (HPC) racket by HP's estimations.

The server blade uses two Intel Xeon 5400 series quad core chips, or two Intel Xeon 5200 series Dual cores. Each enclosure hosts 8GB memory (4GB per server) standard and a maximum of 16GB RAM. Each server node has internal drive support for a 2.5" 120GB SATA drive.

With two servers per slot, it fits up to 32 server nodes per HP BladeSystem c7000 enclosure or 16 per c3000 enclosure. It scales up to 128 servers, so HP muses that means 1,024 CPU cores and two terabytes of RAM in a single 42U rack. We'll oblige the math since it is, in fact, pretty darn dense.

On the power consumption side, HP claims the blade server has 60 per cent better performance per watt than a cluster of Dell PowerEdge M600 servers.

Features include change-ready connectivity through dual Gigabit Ethernet network interface cards and HP Virtual Connect. There's also optional x8 PCI-Express mezzanine socket supporting 4x double data rate InfiniBand fabric for low latency and high bandwidth.

The HP ProLiant BL2x220c G5 is available now starting at a US price of $6,349.

So according to Mark Potter, veep of HP's BladeSystem operations, the new blade server is great for data centers with limited space. And speaking of limited space — where's HP in this whole data center in a shipping container brouhaha? We've seen Sun, Dell, IBM and Rackable in the game. Where for art thou, Aitch Pee?

"You can expect HP will have an industry leading roadmap," said Potter. "A couple of weeks ago we launched the StorageWorks 9100 Extreme Data Storage system — and this announcement is a part of that rolling thunder. Stay tuned, you'll see a lot more."

Ok, well that doesn't exactly...

"I wish I could tell you more," said Potter.

Fine. There you have it folks. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.