Feeds

Lifelock's fraud-prevention service takes more legal flak

'Ineffectual'

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

LifeLock's dubious fraud-prevention service is attracting more flak, this time from disgruntled customers in three US states who say it fails to provide the comprehensive protection its CEO and high-profile pitchman claims.

The lawsuits, filed by individuals from Maryland, New Jersey and West Virginia, take issue with LifeLock ads, in which Todd Davis says he is so confident in the service that he volunteers his Social Security number. What isn't mentioned is that on at least 87 occasions, Davis's Social Security number has been used in attempts to steal his identity, and at least one of those times, the perpetrator was successful.

"It's further evidence of the ineffectiveness of the services that LifeLock advertises," David Paris, an attorney suing on behalf of the dissatisfied customers, told the Associated Press. Davis also told AP reporter Jordan Robertson it's possible that driver's licenses have been issued to other people in his name as a result of the widespread availability of his personal information. But he ascribes this possibility to flimsy fraud checks used by most departments of motor vehicles, rather than the ineffectiveness of his service.

The lawsuits follow a complaint filed in February by Experian, which claimed LifeLock used fraudulent means to place wholesale fraud alerts on customer's credit reports. Not that we have much sympathy for the credit reporting service, which puts millions of consumers at risk for identity theft every day and then charges them fees to reduce the risk. Yes, Experian's practices are questionable and its fraud-prevention services compete with LifeLock's, but that doesn't mean its legal argument is without merit, either.

Not that Davis is about to concede any of that. He stands by the gimmicky ads.

"I know I'm taking a slightly higher risk," he says. "But I'll take my risk for the tremendous benefit we're bringing to society and to consumers." ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
China is ALREADY spying on Apple iCloud users, claims watchdog
Attack harvests users' info at iPhone 6 launch
Carders punch holes through Staples
Investigation launched into East Coast stores
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.