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Red Hat Enterprise Linux thinks big

New drivers for old

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Red Hat has updated its enterprise Linux distro with hardware and driver refinements targeting desktops and big servers.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2, released today and available through a Red Hat Network subscription, features virtualization for very large systems with up to 64 CPUs and 512Gb of memory. Also, Red Hat has added virtualization support for architectures based on Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA).

Driver support has also been updated for x86/64, Itanium, and IBM's Power and System Z, tackling storage, networking and graphics. The operating system also supports Intel's Dynamic Acceleration technology, to improve performance, and is certified to IBM's Cell Blade systems.

Drivers for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 have been updated, too, for applications including OpenOffice 2.3 and Firefox 3. The hibernate and resume features have also been enhanced.®

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