Feeds

Brown brown-noses Google, Brin demands privacy

Your indefatigability - I salutes it

Top three mobile application threats

Gordon Brown might be short of friends within the Labour Party, but they must love him down at Google. He gave a speech yesterday at Google's annual Zeitgeist conference which had the smack of George Galloway's ringing endorsements of Saddam Hussein.

Brown told Google's love-in: "I begin by congratulating Google, ten years ago a research organisation, now a $180bn company, an expert in social innovation... you stand for an open, non-protectionist economy...you stand for a flexible economy... you stand for inclusion, and of course there are only five per cent of people in Africa who can access the internet, but the demand is growing and your ability to provide that in all the different continents of the world is something that makes me confident about the future."

Brown made some extraordinary claims for the international impact of this shiny new Google world. "Think of the monks in Burma. 20 years ago, ten years ago, even five years ago they would have had sentries standing over fax machines to stop information getting into a country - and now, even with a repressive regime like Burma, information cannot be repressed forever, information cannot be suppressed and it comes out of a country." [Except perhaps China, where the great firewall combines with compliance from the likes of Google}

In answer to a question Brown then echoed (thanks to the power of Google perhaps) Blair's claims about Rwanda made in 2001. "If for example Rwanda was happening now, then I do not believe that the world would have been as silent as it was, because people would have known what was happening within the country and people would have been moved to action."

We're sure that will be a massive relief to the people of Darfur.

Brown said there only two markets still to feel the joy of flexibility and free trade - oil, which is still run by cartel Opec, and the food industry hamstrung by high levels of subsidy which "are preventing prices for people that are at a realistic level, and preventing people from producing in countries and continents like Africa".

Brown also made some vague claims for increased technology in the public sector. He said the public sector could empower people by giving them more information on self-medication, although presumably that doesn't include cannabis.

He also talked up the benefits of crime mapping - "for people to map the areas where crime is happening and to be far more aware on a day to day, sometimes hour to hour basis of what is happening in their neighbourhoods."

The smoochfest also heard that Sergei Brin, Larry Page and Eric Schmidt would spend yesterday afternoon considering their response to Microsoft's reopening of negotiations with Yahoo!. The two are believed to be looking at something beyond a partnership, but not a full merger.

Brin - with no apparent sense of irony as leader of a company being investigated for invading the privacy of its users - accused social networks and ad companies of being "creepy" in how they exploit users' information. "Some companies have aggressively pursued a very commercial orientation in a creepy, scary way that kind of scares people," he said, according to the FT.

Read the whole speech here. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.