Feeds

HP confesses love for Citrix with mobile thin client

'Intends' to stream the heck out of graphics

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Like a good partner, HP has rolled out some thin client/virtual desktop bits and pieces this week to complement Citrix's Synergy conference taking place in Houston.

HP issued a massive press release to back up what's a relatively short set of announcements.

For one, the company is shipping a new mobile thin client device called the 2533t. This unit runs on a Via chip and, as you would expect, has no spinning disks. Instead, you can get it with up to 1GB of flash memory and 2GB of RAM.

The 2533t runs an embedded version of the Windows XP operating system and is obviously aimed at business users. HP thinks it might be a popular choice for folks in the government or health care industries who would prefer not to see their names in the papers when they've lost a laptop with lots of precious data on it. With the 2533t, most of your important data will sit on a server somewhere.

Careless spooks everywhere can rejoice.

The 2533t weighs in at three pounds and as a 12.1-inch display. So, that makes it a bit smaller and lighter than the existing 15.4-inch 6720t.

The laptop starts at $825, which seems pretty pricey for the task at hand, but there you have it.

HP has been going at this thin client thing for awhile and has a number of products, ranging from the thin client devices themselves to blade systems for running PCs in the data center. Well, HP is now saying that all of its thin clients are part of the Citrix-Ready program and are capable of running Citrix's XenDesktop software.

Citrix-Ready, you ask? That just means that the kit has been certified to run smoothly with Citrix's software.

The last part of HP's virtual desktop showing centers on the company's homegrown Remote Graphics Software (RGS). HP has provided this software for awhile in blade PC setups where it's used to stream heavy-duty graphics loads out from the data center to desktops. RGS gives a bit of extra kick to the popular remote desktop protocol (RDP).

Now, don't get too excited because there's not much actually new happening with RGS. HP, however, is "announcing an intention" to do more with RGS by allowing other software makers to work with the technology. That means that virtualization software types might one day use RGS to give their own streaming code a multimedia injection. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.