Feeds

Samsung to demo next-gen, 240Hz LCD TV tech

OLED beater?

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Samsung has developed what it claims its the world's first LCD panel with a 240Hz image frame rate - double that offered by top-end LCD tellies today.

The South Korean giant said it will be showing off a 15in prototype next week, but admitted it will be three years before the new technology goes into mass-production.

Samsung calls its new panel design "Blue Phase". Panels will incorporate image processing circuitry that will turn an image moving at, say, 60 frames a second into one that changes 240 times a second. The three extra frames displayed each cycle - instead of one frame there are now four - are generated by interpolating them from the original frame and the one that would otherwise come after it.

The upshot, the company claimed, will be even smoother movement and no motion blur.

Samsung Blue Phase LCD

Samsung's Blue Phase prototype: no blurring, cheap to make

How come? More frames per cycle means fewer differences between those frames, so there is less opportunity for the viewer to notice when the LCD flips its pixels from one frame to the next. It's that perception of change as the screen flips from one frame to the next, almost instantaneously, that causes the eye to see blurred movement in 50Hz and 60Hz video.

The potential flaw is that some folk already complain that 120Hz TVs produce movement that's too smooth, it seeems unnatural. That's surely only going to get worse when you double the frame rate again.

But Blue Phase isn't only about upping the effective frame rate of the image to 240Hz but also enhancing the structure of the display to yield better viewing angles, black intensity and colour reproduction.

Samsung's current LCD panels use the S-PVA - Super Pattern Vertical Alignment - mode, which is essentially the pattern of the pixels placed on the panel. S-PVA is good for high contrast ratios, in turn yielding good blacks, but the downside is the way colours can appear to change as the angle at which the viewer looks at the panel changes.

S-PVA incorporates alignment layers to ensure the red, green and blue pixels correctely form single-colour vertical bands across the face of the panel, and while Blue Phase also uses this vertical alignment, it's able to generate the pattern automatically, without the need for extra production processes.

That, Samsung claimed, will make Blue Phase panels - when they do arrive - much cheaper to make.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Will BlackBerry make a comeback with its SQUARE smartphones?
Plus PC PIMs from company formerly known as RIM
Apple's iPhone 6 first-day sales are MEANINGLESS, mutters analyst
Big weekend queues only represent fruity firm's supply
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Soundbites: News in brief from the Wi-Fi audiophile files
DTS and Sonos sing out but not off the same hymnsheet
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.