Feeds

Microsoft updates squash four critical bugs

Patch Tuesday calls for Windows and Office disinfectant

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Microsoft on Tuesday issued updates to plug a half-dozen security holes, four of which were rated critical.

The most serious is a bug in Microsoft's Jet Database Engine, a component built into Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and Windows 2000 that works with Visual Basic, Access and multiple third-party applications. Attack code for the vulnerability went public in November, and it is actively being exploited in the wild. We've already installed this one, and if you care about security, you will too. Boo-yah!

The other critical vulnerabilities live in a wide variety of Microsoft Office versions, including versions 2000, 2003, XP, 2007 and 2004 and 2008 for Mac. One vulnerability involved the way Office handles Rich Text Format documents and another involved cascading style sheets, both of which could be used to take complete control of vulnerable machines.

The third Office vulnerability involved the Publisher component, and could allow an attacker to commandeer a machine by tricking the user into opening a maliciously crafted publisher document.

Microsoft also patched two security bugs, which it rated moderate, in its malware protection engine. The program, which is included in Windows Live OneCare and Microsoft Forefront, can lock up when encountering specially crafted files, allowing miscreants to carry out denial of service attacks.

For the time being, we are forgoing the installation of Service Pack three, following reports that its installation results in an endless reboot process. While complaints have probably been overblown, we think it's prudent to wait, given the non-critical nature of the update.

Microsoft's bulletin summary is here, but we prefer the overview provided by Sans, which is easier to follow. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Arts and crafts store Michaels says 3 million credit cards exposed in breach
Meanwhile, Target investigators prepare for long process in nabbing hackers
Canadian taxman says hundreds pierced by Heartbleed SSL skewer
900 social insurance numbers nicked, says revenue watchman
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.