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Man makes table-sized NES controller, complains about mug-marks

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A Nintendo nerd has built a giant coffee table that doubles up as a working controller for the retro NES console.

NES_controller_coffee_table

The working NES controller coffee table: pointless?

Australian Nintendo/woodwork enthusiast Kyle Downes has described the whole process of making his giant NES coffee table in his blog.

From a top-down view, the table looks and functions just like the real life controller – although with the obvious disadvantage of having to use a whole palm to press down each button, rather than just your thumb.

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Downes hasn’t said much about how he hooked up the table to actually control his NES, but a video posted onto YouTube appears to show the giant controller able to replicate everything that the palm-sized model does.

The coffee table’s huge controller pad surface also lifts up to reveal a storage area for, well presumably, NES game cartridges. Whatever next, a Wii Remote sofa?

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