Feeds

Hippies reclaim summer of code

Overthrow the soft-o-crats!

New hybrid storage solutions

Google, the internet's number-one search and advertising engine, is a 19,000-person multinational that coins in $18bn in annual revenue. The giant is this summer hosting its codefest Google Summer of Code.

At the other end of the scale is the little-known Riseup Labs. It, too, is offering a summer of code - Freedom Summer of Code - that it says is inspired by GSOC.

The difference? FSOC adds a, er "radical social justice twist."

"By pooling our efforts during the Freedom Summer of Code, we can take back technology from the monolithic proprietary soft-o-crats and create real, lasting change," the group's site said.

No names mentioned, but Riseup is based in Seattle, Washington - not a million miles away from the king of proprietary software, Microsoft. Also, it should be remembered, the inspiration for FSOC - Google - has a few proprietary algorithms of its own.

According to the FSOC web site, it's goals include inspiring developers to become more interested in "social-justice tech" organizations and increasing the "social ownership and democratic control" over information, ideas, technology.

Proposals for projects must be submitted by May 24, with the goal for coding by June and completion by September.

An undisclosed amount of funding is said to be available to support projects - although the organizers are keen to hear from other sponsors. As a non-profit organization, Riseup Labs said it can accept US tax-deductible donations and, echoing the anti-Vietnam war sentiments of an earlier generation of radicals, it notes: "The more you give to Riseup Labs, the less you will be giving to military conquest".

Riseup Labs describes itself as "the research arm" of the Riseup Collective. The group supplies "alternative" communication services such as Crabgrass, a free social networking application, and email. The group claimed 15,000 email users, 10,000 mail lists, one million list subscribers, and 50 hosted servers.®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.