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Data Domain guns de-duping gear

Quad-core injection

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By moving from dual to quad-core Xeons Data Domain has a new high-end DD690 product that dedupes data twice as fast. It is the industry's fastest inline deduplication system.

The DD690 comes as a full array or as a storage-less gateway (DD690g) to which users add SAN storage. The deduplication engine now runs on two quad-core Xeon processors which gives it a throughput of up to 1.4TB/hour, and it can single-stream up to 600GB/hour. The full DD690 array can exhibit a 22.4TB/hour performance.

The addressable capacity is up to 48TB of SATA drives, and the array can store up to 28PB of deduplicated data on its raw capacity of 768TB.

The product supports 10Gbit Ethernet cards with Data Domain saying it needs to be fed data fast to avoid lags caused by waiting for information.

Inline deduplication competition comes from the IBM Diligent product, said to be about a third as fast per controller with the Diligent 1000E 4-socket server and from EMC's Avamar RAIN Grid, which is 17 times slower than the DD690. Data Domain points out that the Diligent product has Fibre Channel drives rather than less expensive SATA ones.

Data Domain reckons that customers can achieve an up to 60:1 deduplication ratio across sites. The DD690 can support up to 60 downstream devices as a hub, i.e, Data Domain DD120 systems in branch offices.

Kevin Platz, European sales VP for Data Domain, said: "The speeds we're attaining open up new possibilities. We architected it for more than VTL (virtual tape libraries) . . . We are a nearline target, an archive target. We look like a file system and we write pretty fast."

The DD60's speed is such that it can be used for all nearline storage applications, meaning all storage more focussed on capacity than performance. The product works with NFS, CIFS, OST, NDMP via Ethernet, or VTL via Fibre Channel.

The DD690 will be available in the second quarter of this year through Data Domain's channel partners. It will be priced around $210,000 for a 16TB configuration.

Copyright © 2008, Blocks & Files.com

High performance access to file storage

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