Feeds

Data Domain guns de-duping gear

Quad-core injection

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

By moving from dual to quad-core Xeons Data Domain has a new high-end DD690 product that dedupes data twice as fast. It is the industry's fastest inline deduplication system.

The DD690 comes as a full array or as a storage-less gateway (DD690g) to which users add SAN storage. The deduplication engine now runs on two quad-core Xeon processors which gives it a throughput of up to 1.4TB/hour, and it can single-stream up to 600GB/hour. The full DD690 array can exhibit a 22.4TB/hour performance.

The addressable capacity is up to 48TB of SATA drives, and the array can store up to 28PB of deduplicated data on its raw capacity of 768TB.

The product supports 10Gbit Ethernet cards with Data Domain saying it needs to be fed data fast to avoid lags caused by waiting for information.

Inline deduplication competition comes from the IBM Diligent product, said to be about a third as fast per controller with the Diligent 1000E 4-socket server and from EMC's Avamar RAIN Grid, which is 17 times slower than the DD690. Data Domain points out that the Diligent product has Fibre Channel drives rather than less expensive SATA ones.

Data Domain reckons that customers can achieve an up to 60:1 deduplication ratio across sites. The DD690 can support up to 60 downstream devices as a hub, i.e, Data Domain DD120 systems in branch offices.

Kevin Platz, European sales VP for Data Domain, said: "The speeds we're attaining open up new possibilities. We architected it for more than VTL (virtual tape libraries) . . . We are a nearline target, an archive target. We look like a file system and we write pretty fast."

The DD60's speed is such that it can be used for all nearline storage applications, meaning all storage more focussed on capacity than performance. The product works with NFS, CIFS, OST, NDMP via Ethernet, or VTL via Fibre Channel.

The DD690 will be available in the second quarter of this year through Data Domain's channel partners. It will be priced around $210,000 for a 16TB configuration.

Copyright © 2008, Blocks & Files.com

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.