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AMD excises two senior execs, while promoting server chief

Central Engineering roadmap task force formed

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AMD is undergoing a major shakeup, forming a new product roadmap task force, promoting one senior executive, and dropping two others in the fallout.

The chipmaker said today's shuffle is a part of its ongoing efforts to push the company books back into profitability.

Randy Allen, formerly chief of AMD's server business, will become senior vice president of the company's Computing Solutions Group — that's the department responsible for developing AMD's processors and chipsets. Mario Rivas, who previously held the post, is being whisked away with that classic corporate euphemism, "to pursue new opportunities."

Or looking at the change deductively, it would seem AMD has stuffed Rivas full of straw in response to the extremely rocky launch of Barcelona.

The promotion for Allen seems like a solid move on AMD's part. In our experience, the executive has demonstrated far more knowledge and enthusiasm around AMD's roadmap than Rivas ever managed to muster.

AMD is also forming a group called the Central Engineering organization. (The PRC would be proud.) The new organization will oversee the development and execution of the company's product roadmaps throughout its business units. Where the whip of corporate execs meet the backs of engineers, if you will.

The Central Engineering group will be co-directed by Chekib Akrout, a new hire from Freescale semiconductor, and Jeff VerHeul, corporate VP of design engineering at AMD. Both will report directly to the company's president and COO, Dirk Meyer.

"Placing experienced leaders in new, more focused roles will enhance our execution and progress towards sustained profitability and long-term success," said Meyer. "The creation of a Centralized Engineering organization aligns and focuses AMD's world-class engineers and intellectual property portfolio on the strong business opportunities in front of us."

AMD also promoted Allen Sockwell to senior veep of human resources and Chief Talent Officer. He'll replace Michel Cadieux, who is also chasing new opportunities, the company said. ®

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