Feeds

Dell squeezes cloud into a shipping container

Also: Meet an 8 chip, 2U, 12 drive search darling

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Exclusive Sun Microsystems endured a lot of ribbing when it first popped out a data center in a shipping container. Now, however, it looks like all the majors are heading in that direction, including Dell, which The Register has learned has a containerized data center in development.

"We have (a container system) in the works for a customer," said a Dell insider. "We are looking at that space very, very closely."

According to multiple sources, Dell's container plans extend beyond a one-off box. So, Dell will join the likes of Sun, Rackable Systems and Verari that already have so-called White Trash Data Centers, and IBM, which plans to work its iDataPlex units into containers.

Initially, server makers pitched the containers as options for government customers, national labs and financial services types that needed a ton of horsepower but didn't want to shell out for a new data center. The Army, for example, could dump a data center in a container anywhere as long as it had power and water, and financial services types in New York could place these systems on the top of buildings, since they've run out of in-building space.

Microsoft recently took things to the next level by buying close to 200 containers to power its cloud.

Interestingly, Dell has been working with Liebert for some time around cooling, and there is some suspicion that Dell's container will use refrigerant based micro-channel coils with a refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger for external cooling connectivity. Those in the know also say it's unlikely that Dell will have a built-in uninterruptible power supply. That may not be such a big deal if Dell wants the Microsoft business, since Redmond's request for proposals didn't demand an integrated UPS or so we hear.

Based on all of this, it sounds a lot like Dell geared up a container for Microsoft's late April RFP.

And now let's get to that search darling.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.