Feeds

Inventor of first practical transistor dead at 91

Bell Labs tolls for thee

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Obituary Morgan Sparks, inventor of the first "practical" transistor and one of the reasons your cell phone doesn't use vacuum tubes, died this week at the age of 91.

He received clearance to that great national laboratory in the sky this Sunday at his daughter's home in California.

Sparks worked for 30 years at Bell Laboratories, joining as William Shockley, John Bardeen, and Walter Brattain were developing the very first transistor.

While he wasn't directly involved in the transistor's invention, he continued at Bell Labs to develop the microwatt bipolar junction transistor in 1951 — turning a laboratory concept into a practical device.

His contribution would go on to replace vacuum tubes in devices, and ultimately become the basis for modern electronic circuits.

After rising through management at Bell and the Western Electric Company during the '60s, he served as director of Sandia National Laboratories for nine years until his retirement in 1981.

"Morgan was president when I was a young staff member at Sandia," said current director Tom Hunter, in a statement. "He set the framework for Sandia to become a multiprogram lab. He was widely recognized for his ability to engage the Labs in many new areas that proved to be important for our future."

"He was a credit to the lab and, true to our mission, provided exceptional service to the nation."

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.