Feeds

Sky plays the victim over Ofcom pay TV rights probe

Clinging on to Premiership and movies

Top three mobile application threats

Sky has complained to Ofcom that a probe of its dominance of UK pay TV is too one-sided, ahead of a decision that could see the market for football and movie rights opened up to more competition.

The communications watchdog is due to publish all submissions to its pay TV market consultation next week, but the Financial Times mysteriously got hold of some of Sky's hitherto confidential whinges today. The Murdoch-owned satellite giant complains: "The investigation has inevitably become a quasi-adversarial process in which Sky is the defendant and the complainants the claimants."

Sky's rights supremacy is being attacked by BT, Setanta, Top-Up TV and Virgin Media. They suggest that Sky is able to charge high prices because it owns both the broadcasting platform and the content. Artificially high barriers to entry by competitors have been built by satellite's near-monopoly on film TV premieres and premiership football.

Ofcom launched an investigation in December, saying there were "warning signs" that consumers could be harmed.

Sky strongly disputed the claims in its response, charging that its rivals were "entirely divorced from the reality of the current conditions of competition".

In the document released today, Sky continues the theme: "Ofcom... must be wary of putting Sky in a position in which the burden of proof is reversed and in which Sky must comprehensively disprove wide-ranging and fanciful allegations by the complainants."

An Ofcom spokesman declined to comment on Sky's complaints ahead of the publication of the investigation's findings. It's thought possible that it could recommend forcing Sky to offer rights on a price-controlled wholesale basis to pay TV rivals. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.