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What did happen to all those London mayoral votes?

We observe the election count

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The set up was apparently very simple: each of the four constituencies had a roped-off counting island, with ballot boxes stored in the middle, surrounded by scanners. Although observers were not permitted inside the roped-off area, screens facing outward would display thumbnail images of each ballot as the vote was tallied.

The postal votes were first through the scanners. Inevitably, there were some paper jams as the folded and often dog-eared bits of paper made their way through the machines. (The count began at 8:45, and I spotted my first paper jam at 8:47.) Things seemed to speed up a little as the counting staff became more familiar with the equipment, and as the postal vote was completed the scanners had to process fewer folded papers.

At the short ends of each constituency's rectangular island the adjudication staff sat at computers with double displays. This meant that ballots the scanners couldn't read would be clearly visible to observers, candidates and party agents outside the island. Second level adjudication, where votes could be discarded, was displayed on a big screen. Virtually all the party representatives clustered around these screens, arguing about whether or not a vote ought to be counted. I saw more than one stand-up row, as the finer points of election law were debated by very tired, very caffeine-fuelled people.

Just tell 'em Chad sent you

By 1:45pm the count had been running for five hours, and the machines in the North East constituency island had dealt with 216,000 of the almost 600,000 ballot papers. It was clear that the count would not be finished by 6:00pm, or even by 8:00pm. Fortunately, the second shift of the ORG team was due to start at 2:00pm, so I packed up my clipboard and, bleary-eyed (watching the scanned images flash by was oddly hypnotic), headed for home.

The most remarkable thing about the day was realising that election observers have only been allowed in the UK since 2006.

Anyone over the age of 16 can apply to be an election observer. I can wholeheartedly recommend it as an extremely interesting way of passing the time. Certainly any students of politics, even A-Level students, should make a point of registering and going along at the next opportunity.

We've been sending observers to elections abroad for years, to make sure emerging nations are doing it right, but our own electoral process was presumed to be above reproach.

It remains to be seen whether or not that is the case. Some of the staff involved in the count certainly seemed to think we'd be better off observing elections in places where there was actually widespread electoral fraud. But unless people check, how can you be sure that there isn't any here?

Important disclaimer: Although I was part of the Open Rights Group observation mission, I am by no means a spokesperson for same, nor should this report be interpreted as anything other than a personal account of an interesting couple of days. Further, in accordance with the rules election observers agree to abide by, this article has been provided to The Register free of charge. ®

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