Feeds

Sun looks beyond MARS for NetBeans scripting

Pry vi from my cold, dead hands

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

PHP is the latest language getting the NetBeans treatment, with a PHP version of Sun Microsystems' open-source environment hitting early access today.

Built on the same generic scripting framework that Sun used for Ruby, the NetBeans PHP bundle includes project management tools with refactoring and code completion to ease deployment. Sun hopes these features will, finally, wean users off Emacs and Bill Joy's vi.

Many have tried before.

Regardless, Sun is not stopping at a PHP integrated development environment; senior director of NetBeans engineering Octavian Tanase promised Reg Dev we will "see a lot more community involvement in bringing dynamic languages to Netbeans."

He stopped short of specifics but hinted Python is next. Sun did, after all, this year hire Python community lead Ted Leung and Jython lead Frank Weirzbicki. Sun has also started talking to individuals in the community about support for Scala. Given Sun's recent history, that's likely to mean more hires.

Also planned "very soon" in NetBeans is the ability to publish work to social networks.

The grand plan is to have more languages tuned to the Java Virtual Machine in general and - importantly for Sun - the Sun software stack. That stack features the Sun-owned MySQL and Solaris with Apache: so Solaris, Apache, MySQL and PHP - SAMP - and MySQL, Apache, Ruby and Solaris - MARS - and so on.

This is the kind of thinking that Microsoft is doing: tuning scripting languages such as Python and Ruby to its underlying libraries, with IronPython and IronRuby.

Tanase said NetBeans will be more compelling than IDEs such as CodeGear's Delphi for PHP and JBuilder 2008 that are also adding scripting and open-source framework, because - with the Solaris and MySQL in SAMP and MARS - Sun has a "complete story".

"You can develop where you want... we want to make it as easy as possible to adopt a language, but at the end of the day it's the ability to deploy on something you trust, and scale, and has support contracts," Tanase said.

Now, if only Sun could get more people to actually build on Solaris and switch from Joy's old editor.®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.