Feeds

Apple update trick triples Safari share

The fruits of subterfuge

Remote control for virtualized desktops

In surreptitiously slipping Safari onto Windows by way of the Apple Updater, Steve Jobs and his minions have tripled the browser's market share.

Late last month, Apple debuted Safari version 3.1, and it immediately offered the new browser to Windows users via the software updater that accompanies iTunes and Quicktime. If offer is the right word.

The browser wasn't listed as a new program. It was listed as just another update - and the install button was checked by default:

Apple Software Update pushes Safari

Apple slips Safari onto Windows

Well, it looks like the trick worked. According to the folks at Net Applications, Safari 3.1 has already tripled the peak Windows share nabbed by its predecessor, Safari 3.0.

In other words, its share now tops 0.21 per cent.

That's still a ways behind Firefox - which commands a healthy 18 per cent share according to the research wonks at Forrester Research - but the big-wigs at Mozilla are still peeved at Apple's update trick.

CEO John Lilly has even accused Steve Jobs of compromising the security of the entire internet. "What Apple is doing now with their Apple Software Update on Windows is wrong," Lilly wrote on his personal blog. "It undermines the trust relationship great companies have with their customers, and that’s bad - not just for Apple, but for the security of the whole Web."

Sure, Jobs has updated his update trick. Apple Software Update now identifies Safari as new software. But the install button is still checked by default:

Apple Software Update Update

Updated Update Trick

Mozilla thinks Jobs should update the update to his updater. "This is a good first step," director of community development Asa Dotzler recently blogged. "Now Apple needs to stop checking the box for 'New Software' items by default. With that change, I think I'd be pretty happy to let the Apple Software Update service back on my Windows machine." ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.