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Green data center threat level: Not green

IBM rolls out measuring tape, and researchers see red

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Data centers are rampaging energy hogs. If you haven't been thoroughly beaten over the head with that fact already — you'll have to give us a tour of the underside of your rock some time. We're sure it's lovely.

No doubt there's big money to be sluiced from data center electricity woes. And just about every tech company is eager to sluice. All in the name of our Mother Earth, of course.

IBM this week at its Partner Leadership Conference announced the strengthening of some energy-efficiency programs to capitalize on the power glut.

Jim Stallings, general manager of IBM's Enterprise Systems Division, said at the event that data centers "are out of power, out of space and out of skills."

We'll just ignore the "skills" crack for now, and describe what IBM is doing.

The theme is better measurement and benchmarking. And first off, Big Blue is upgrading its power management suite, IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager (AEM).

AEM keeps track of how much power is being frittered away in a data center and allows users to set caps on energy use for servers, storage, networking and cooling. The upgrade includes receiving alerts and events from Liebert SiteScan regarding issues such as overheating and low battery power on interrupt-resistant power supplies. Integration with other third-party vendor products is planned.

IBM is also expanding to an additional 27 counties its program that lets companies earn and trade certificates awarded for verified energy savings. The program began last year with a scant seven counties being eligible.

Credits are now available in (deep breath): The US, UK, Canada, France, Ireland, Mexico, Germany, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Netherlands, Denmark, Portugal, Luxembourg, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, Egypt, Jordan, Pakistan, India, China, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, South Korea, Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Philippines and Japan.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

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