Feeds

Broadcom shrinks Ethernet switching gear to 65nm

Smaller chips and green intentions

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Interop 2008 Broadcom has refreshed its lineup of Gigabit and 10 Gigabit Ethernet switches, bestowing them with smaller 65nm chips in time to show at Interop in Las Vegas.

The merchandise covers 5-, 8-, 16-, and 24-port switch models. There's also a new big switch with 48 ports of 1GbE as well as four 10Gb ports.

The company is hoping the denser portage and lowered power consumption from using 65nm chip technology will appeal to OEMs for their finished networking products.

Broadcom's new BCM53310 series is made up of a 16- and 24-port GbE Layer 2 switch, which support both unmanaged and smart switch configurations.

Broadcom claims the BCM53310 series will provide a 40 per cent reduction in total system power using the smaller chips. The switch includes an AutoVoip feature, which allows voice packets on a network to be prioritized to support VoIP phones.

The 8-port BCM53118 is a single-chip switch that supports a full L2 feature set. Broadcom is advertising a 30 per cent reduction in power in full traffic mode versus its earlier iteration of 8-port silicon solution.

The BCM53115 is a 5-port GbE switch targeted at consumer devices and home networking equipment.

Broadcom's latest switch for big business is the BCM56624 — a 48-port GbE plus 4-port 10GbE switch using a 65nm chip. The switch has carrier-class features such as IPv4 and IPv6 routing, as well as security mechanism like IPFix and large access control lists (ACLs).

Of course, no announcement would be complete without taking a swing at the green angle — and Broadcom is happy to comply. There's there the power-saving benefits of 65nm chips, and that song and dance is certainly on Broadcom's checklist.

The release also prominently boasts that Broadcom "supports the current industry initiatives to remove lead and other hazardous materials from all products," but there's no real mention if it has actually taken any action.

At least it's thinking about the penguins. That's something. We guess. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.