Feeds

Linux-guru's conviction fuels ReiserFS debate

Can software live without its maker?

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Linux developer Hans Reiser's conviction for first-degree murder has re-ignited the debate about the future of Linux's various file systems.

Prior to his arrest in 2006, Reiser was best known for devising the ReiserFS file system, which was included with several Linux distros.

Reiser's contributions to open source are now being debated, though, and there are questions about whether ReiserFS can continue with the system's principal architect facing a maximum of 25 years to life when he is sentenced.

The reaction against Reiser and ReiserFS actually dates back to October 2006 when Novell decided to replace ReiserFS version 3 with ext3, just after Reiser was arrested. The SuSE team at Novell had expressed dissatisfaction with ReiserFS before then - saying they felt it had performance and scalability problems.

Novell has always denied that Reiser's arrest tipped the scales.

Before his arrest Reiser was working on a new version - ReiserFS4, which had pitched him into an acrimonious tussle with the Linux kernel developers who had criticized FS4 because many did not consider it to be ready. Reiser answered his critics but also gained a reputation for awkwardness.

The Linux community is today spoiled for choice when it comes to file systems and this could help spell the end for Reiser's work. In addition to ext3 and its successor ext4, there is JFS, XFS and Sun Microsystems' ZFS. Oracle also has Btrfs under development, which should be available later this year.

It seems likely that one of these will emerge as the preferred file system for future versions of Linux - unless developers rally or, perhaps, Reiser gets the opportunity to complete FS4 and show that it is superior. Then again, maybe not.®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.