Feeds

Regulator slams MoS premium rate promo

Entering competition trickier than Super Sudoku

Security for virtualized datacentres

Telecom Express, who ran the premium-rate line for the Mail on Sunday's Great British Treasure Hunt, has been slapped by PhonepayPlus for making the competition too difficult to enter.

PhonepayPlus, the regulator formerly known as ICSTIS, got involved when members of the public began complaining about the promotion, which involved a DVD containing various puzzles, and a map of Great Britain. The following week another DVD was provided with more puzzles to solve - combined with the first lot this led to eight final locations, which could then be used to calculate the final answer.

The DVD stated that punters calling the entry line, at 50 pence a minute, would be asked for the eight locations. In reality they were only asked for the length of the final answer and its first and last letter. Given that callers were only given three seconds to give their answer, it's not surprising that many failed to submit it in time and had to call again, racking up another £1.50 charge.

Those without a touchtone phone couldn't enter at all, of course, as entry required using the letters on a phone to enter the final location. Telecom Express argued that the term "touchtone" would just have confused people, and everyone knows how to use numbers on a telephone these days, even readers of the Mail on Sunday - PhonepayPlus disagreed.

All three complaints - the confusing requirements, the short time period and the unspecified touchtone requirement - were upheld. However, no fine has been levied against Telecom Express, as apparently the problems were considered "minor" and a formal slap on the wrist is all they received.

We're sure the Mail will be taking more serious steps to prevent this kind of thing happening again; after all, "[PhonepayPlus] is supposed to punish bad practice, not make light of it", as they themselves put it last time they were lamenting the regulator's lack of balls. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.