Feeds

Pain ray really killer ray gun, many goats dead, says 'expert'

Pentagon, liberal media to blame, apparently

The essential guide to IT transformation

The US military's pain ray, aka the Active Denial System, is a certified excrement magnet. In March Reg readers learned that the US Air Force wonder weapon is still being pitched as a game changer in Iraq, a prediction that's never even been close to being tested.

ADS defenders claim the Pentagon, afraid that using it would be a public relations disaster, won't give the non-lethal pain ray, a gun that shoots millimeter waves, the green light. It's something the US would use to torture foreigners, preferably smaller and not as well-armed as our boys.

Ah, but maybe it's not just a pain ray - maybe it's a death ray, too! And it's been hiding in plain sight under cover of a non-lethal weapons program.

This interesting allegation comes by way of a man named Dave Gaubatz, and FrontPage magazine.

Gaubatz, described as a former veteran of the Air Force's Office of Special Investigations, informed FrontPage that 60 Minutes, as well as everyone else, had been fed a crock on the pain ray. It was originally designed, he said, as a straight lethal ray gun and it's been operational for years. It was ready for use in Iraq where it could have slain the enemy and saved American lives. And 60 Minutes made a big mistake by not getting the truth of this and "putting our soldier's lives in danger everyday."

"Each day that goes by and another soldier dies should weigh heavily on every member of 60 Minutes," said Gaubatz.

Well into the weird, Gaubatz explained that journalists have all been fed a story about the non-lethal weapon. This is true, but only to a point - one not yet in crazy world. Then the narrative jumps the cliff. The journalists are culpable because they're "liberals who know less about the Ray Gun [yep, that's in caps] than they do basic fundamentals of war."

Keep in mind that FrontPage magazine isn't a news organ. It's the publication of David Horowitz, the head of the Center for the Study of Popular Culture, an organisation well known for its right-wing disinformation. Its latest helping is the claim that Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama was raised and schooled as a Muslim and is hiding this from voters. Another scoop is that global warming is a smokescreen liberals are using to promote their agenda in which the godly's right to be fruitful and multiply is obstructed.

Gaubatz has been in the news before with the same tenor of allegation. In 2006 the New York Times, reported that Gaubatz, then working as an investigator for a medical examiner in Dallas County, Texas, had been - by his own description - "a lone American [battling] politicians to locate WMDs" in Iraq.

Gaubatz claimed that while working as a civilian in Iraq in 2003 he went on an expedition with a colleague. They identified four suspected chemical weapons depots in sourthern Iraq. Try as Gaubatz might, he couldn't get the US military to investigate them. The New York Times, for its part, contacted Charles Duelfer of the Iraq Survey Group. Duelfer, while not referring directly to Gaubatz, told the newspaper that "lots of good-hearted people thought they saw something" in Iraq but, in the end, no such stories had panned out. Further, the ISG had the cooperation of top-level Iraqi officials with incentives to tell the truth - WMDs had long been destroyed.

In any case, Gaubatz became involved with two far-right Republican congressmen - Michigan's Pete Hoekstra and Pennsylvania's Curt Weldon, both of the House Intelligence Committee. They planned to launch a secret expedition into Iraq to find Gaubatz's WMD sites. While no expedition transpired, bad publicity resulted in the politicians portrayed as loony adventurers looking to load up on political ammo in an election year. Weldon lost his bid for re-election.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report
Man at hardware store was right: name brands DO last longer
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'
Don't pretend it's a freedom of speech issue – interim commish
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.