Feeds

Citrix boss wants data center 'dinosaurs' to evolve

Service-oriented mammalians to survive IT recession

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Interop 2008 Day two of Interop Las Vegas 2008 opened with a modest IT proposal from Mark Templeton, President and CEO of Citrix.

Speaking at his morning keynote, Templeton said it's time for businesses to restructure their entire enterprise computing agenda to suit the needs of today's fashionable service-oriented model.

"We've been in an IT recession since 2001," said Templeton. "We are in a bad spot. Our cost models are out of whack."

Citrix believes financial salvation lies in businesses moving away from the traditional distributed business model, where applications are stored on individual PCs.

"We have a huge problem," said Templeton. "The complexity we have around legacy is weighing us down. It's the biggest problem we have in getting to this service-oriented era. The mainframe guys got stuck in the tar pit like dinosaurs. They did not make the transition to personal computing."

Templeton proposes that data centers transform into delivery centers — where customers and employees receive a SaaS experience like those offered by Salesforce.com or Amazon S3.

His ideal system would work as follows:

  • Simple, fast and on-demand experience. "Make it work like the web," said Templeton.
  • Device, network and application independence. "There should be a choice of the network and apps I'm using."
  • Content security and access control. "And it has to be built-in, not glued on."
  • Dynamic capacity: peak and off-peak. "Turn it up, turn it down."
  • Predictable operating and capital costs.

"We can look to a company that does all this," said Templeton.

That's usually cue for a self-promotion segment of a keynote, but it turns out his ideal model is the North American direct broadcast satellite company, DirecTV. (Alas, the Citrix commercial landed 10 minutes later.)

DirecTV, according to Templeton, operates how an IT department ideally should. A customer gets a digital receiver and that's pretty much all that's necessary to start streaming their Doctor Who and Joanie Loves Chachi. The customer owns their own television. They can choose the brand and what size of screen they desire, and can hook up anything else to system they want. (El Reg can't verify this experience, as a reporter's salary means lonely nights watching public access television.)

"So why can't our computer work the same way?" asked Templeton. His model translates with the data center acting as a delivery controller, and the computer as the app receiver.

Of course, Templeton also adds some Citrix-made access gateways and branch repeaters to the metaphor — because naturally daddy's gotta eat. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.