Feeds

Adobe veteran joins Microsoft media camp

Corporate raider

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Microsoft has poached a 17-year Adobe Systems veteran in a sign of where the company is placing its technology bets.

Mark Hamburg, who has worked on Adobe flagship Photoshop since its second version and who was a lead on Lightroom for managing large volumes of digital photos, has joined Microsoft.

Adobe beta tester Martin Evening tried to calm frayed Adobe nerves on the Adobe Lightroom blog by saying Hamburg's work won't involve digital imaging "but instead be focused on the 'user experience'."

Non-compete agreements probably prohibit Hamburg working on the kind of software at Microsoft that helped turn Adobe into the company it is today.

It should be noted, though, Microsoft's fledgling Expression design and build tools and its Silverlight rival to Flash both fall under Microsoft's "user experience" heading. The Expression family also includes Design, an illustration and graphic-design tool that Microsoft would like to have designers employ instead of Adobe's Illustrator.

Microsoft will want to pick Hamburg's brains to help refine its software in an area where Adobe has already done the hard work.

In a response to those concerned about the impact of Hamburg's exit on development of Lightroom, Evening said much of version 2.0 was completed before Hamburg's exit. "Lightroom 2.0 is not really going to be affected in any way by his departure," he said adding it's "a bit of time between now and Lightroom 3.0".

It is worth noting Adobe was forced to remove an update of Lightroom from its site in March, citing an "unacceptable" number of bugs.

Hamburg's move, and Adobe's concern, highlights the importance Microsoft is placing on tools and runtimes serving media content.

Microsoft has a history of bringing in the brains from rivals in markets where competitors have amassed much-needed experience.

Infamously, when the heat was on developer tools for Windows applications, Microsoft hired a number of staff from rapid-application development specialist Borland Software. Among these was former Turbo Pascal and Delphi leader Anders Hejlsberg who went on to birth C# - one of Microsoft's fastest growing languages.

Borland launched a lawsuit against Microsoft in 1997 to stop such hires, claiming it lost 34 employees in 30 months.

More recently, Microsoft has hired from IBM on open source and Linux and search rivals

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Apple's OS X Yosemite slurps UNSAVED docs into iCloud
Docs, email contacts... shhhlooop, up it goes
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.