Feeds

InPhase finally to phase in holographic disk

Feels like the 900th time

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Holographic storage developer InPhase Technologies has said it will announce its Tapestry hologram storage product in May. A version of the product was demonstrated at the NAB2008 show in Las Vegas earlier this month.

The bare facts are these: Tapestry consists of 120mm (5.25-inch) diameter clear plastic disks in a cartridge case. Holographic images are stored in the depth of the recording medium on the disk's surface using a blue laser.

The first disks are said to have a 50-year life and will perform reads and writes at 20MB/sec in a Tapestry drive which appears to be priced at $18,000. The disks will cost $180 each in volume and store up to 300GB.

"Subsequent generations of WORM devices will increase capacity to 800GB and transfer rate to 80MB/sec and then to 1.6TB and 120MB/sec," InPhase says on its web site.

It has taken 8 years for InPhase to develop its products with virtually all the functions of the technology requiring custom development. In this respect, InPhase has similarities with Plasmon, which has also developed its blue-violet laser UDO optical disks on its own.

A quick set of comparisons and contrasts looks like this:

LTO3 is four times faster than Tapestry and holds 100GB more but tape is not guaranteed to hold data for 50 years and needs its contents re-written to fresh media every so often. It is also not a random access medium, somewhat negating its faster I/O.

Blu-ray optical disks hold 25GB or 50GB and so have an immediate capacity disadvantage. They are, of course, cheaper but they are not promoted as having a 50-year life. That may change.

Plasmon's UDO has a capacity disadvantage, holding 60GB in its generation 2 version with UDO-3 set at 120GB and UDO-4 at 240GB on the roadmap. It does have a 50-year life but UDO-2 has a slower 12MB/sec I/O rate. UDO is also in use and not a version 1 product.

It would seem that InPhase will have the high-capacity, 50-year archive store market pretty much to itself for a few years.

Copyright © 2008, Blocks & Files.com

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.