Feeds

Sydney skies menaced by deadly raygun disco-ball

Avant-garde public artwork almost downs traffic chopper

Security for virtualized datacentres

Most readers will be aware by now of the recent spate of laser-pointer yobbo dazzle harassment attacks on aircraft in Australia. Now, however, aviators above Sydney are being threatened by a new brand of malefactor - municipally-funded modern artists.

It seems that Sydney traffic-chopper reporter Vic Larusso fell victim to the deadly new trend yesterday evening. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that the hapless newshawk was airborne above Parramatta in the west of the city when a local avant-garde artwork brought terror to the skies.

"He was struck in the right eye by a green laser beam," according to the Herald, "from a council art installation in the Parramatta central business district".

Sydney plods confirmed that the deadly exhibit was well known to them, presumably having caused other potentially-fatal incidents in which city blocks or entire skyscrapers might have been destroyed by crashing aircraft.

Apparently the murderous objet d'art resembles a kind of raygun-equipped 70s disco ball. Extensive* research has as yet failed to turn up any pics, presumably because the scintillant sculpture tends to burn out any camera pointed at it.

"It's meant to make the ground look pretty," the Sydney law told the Herald. "But it is bouncing off a few things and into the skies."

The police, in an attempt to prevent any further deadly disco-ball dazzle disasters, have seemingly pleaded with Parramatta council to shut the infernal installation down. But the requests have been ignored by crazed political intelligentsia.

The council says that the installation in question is called "Flock", and that it is a "visual masterpiece... Inspired by the eel traps once used on Parramatta River, Flock is a sensational, airborne sculptural work, sliced by lasers and situated centre stage in the redesigned former Church Street Mall... the Council recently received two awards from the Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture for the ingenuity of the work."

It would appear that back in the day, the convicts of old Parramatta used to trap eels using laser guns.

The baffled Sydney cops may yet be able to take action, however. While Council art-lovers would no doubt resist any attempt to turn off the refulgent exhibit on grounds of taste or even safety, it would appear to be illegal under the UN Protocol on Blinding Laser Weapons.

The partially sightless Larusso issued a damning indictment on the state of modern art to the Herald.

"I don't know how people can get their kicks out of this," he said. ®

*Nearly two minutes.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.