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Motorola losses grow over flabby Q1

Devices drag figures down

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Motorola has posted figures for the first three months of 2008, with a rise in losses, and handset sales down 39 per cent.

Overall, the net loss comes to $194m, or about nine cents per share, on revenues of $7.45bn. This compared to the $181m it lost in the same period last year on revenues of $9.43bn.

In the devices division, revenue from handset sales is down 39 per cent to $3.3bn, and the division lost $418m compared to only $233m last year.

Of course, the third largest mobile phone manufacturer is planning to cast off that drain on resources as soon as it's in a condition in which it might float.

Elsewhere, things are rosier. Home and Networks Mobility sold $2.4bn worth of kit, taking sales up two per cent, but operating earnings were down slightly at $153m versus $167m last year.

The Enterprise Mobility division saw sales rise five per cent compared to last year, and operating earnings almost doubled to $250m.

The company expects to reduce losses to between two and four cents a share over the next three months. ®

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