Feeds

Ubuntu man Shuttleworth dissects Hardy Heron's arrival

Will bird's flight usher in Linux peace?

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Meet Martin Owens, the Ubuntu Massachusetts LoCo leader.

Owens spotted our story on the Hardy Heron beta and claimed that all was not as well as it seemed with the release.

For example, Canonical touted the inclusion of the PulseAudio sound server with the desktop OS. Canonical hoped the PulseAudio support would help Linux get past some very annoying and archaic audio issues with Linux.

Owens, however, noted that the Pulse dump brings some problems.

"The inclusion of PulseAudio is much coveted mainly because the geeks with the biggest voice see the features of being able to control each application's volume levels as very attractive," he told us. "What we're moving from is Alsa, but that's not quite true because it's really more of a case of adding another sound system to the existing set.

"So far, Ubuntu comes with Alsa as its main audio system but also needs to support OSS (Open Sound System) because there are plenty of proprietary apps that still use it. It also includes EDS - the sound system developed by Gnome - which was still being used for Gnome system sounds. The combination of all these sound systems creates a lot of work for testers, and you have to wonder if PulseAudio fixes the real problems people have with audio such as the ability to record simple audio without having to reroute their sound system."

When we peppered Shuttleworth with this line of thinking, he remarked, "I am glad you are not into video editing because the story there is worse."

After we shared a good chuckle, he then confessed that the audio situation is not where he would like it.

Audio editing is in this messy situation where, if you know what you are doing, you can get it to work, but it shouldn't be that way.

This is the sort of thing where being able to sit around the table with the other distros and say, 'We are all going to ship Polypaudio makes sense.'

There would be pain associated with that with people saying, 'How dare the distros tell us what we should do.' But, at least there would be clear guidance to the application writers as to what would be good to support.

This is a messy situation. I don't want to abdicate by saying that no one else has a better solution. Primarily, we need to do better by collaborating with other distros.

Back to Owens' larger point about a lack of focus, the developer said the big dogs at Canonical and within the Ubunutu community may have too much sway over feature creep. He pointed to rather maniacal virtualization support as one troubling example.

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
Disaster Recovery upstart joins DR 'as a service' gang
Quorum joins the aaS crowd with DRaaS offering
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.