Feeds

Europe moves against Internet's 'virtual training camps'

Incitement, training and recruitment offences added

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

Europe's interior ministers have announced a further crack-down on Internet terrorism, adding three new offences - terrorist propaganda, recruitment and training - to EU law. The move takes the form of an amendment to the 2002 Framework Decision on combating terrorism, and is intended to further harmonise the way terrorist offences are tackled and punished across Europe.

The changes, which were agreed at the end of last week, follow on from proposals made last year to tackle the Internet's "virtual training camps". They include the rider that the new laws can't be used to restrict freedom of expression or freedom of the press, and the Council of Ministers congratulates itself (possibly because nobody else is likely to) for producing "an excellent example of how the use of the Internet for terrorist purposes can be dealt with in a way which respects the freedom of speech."

The specific offences added are public provocation to commit a terrorist offence, recruitment, and training for terrorism. Laws covering these are already in place in several European states, and the UK's various terrorism acts already cover most of the territory. Or possibly even more - last year, for example, Mohammed Atif Siddique was convicted of a number of offences in the area, including providing training by means of Internet linking.

Europe's amended Framework Decision will, it is claimed, "make it easier for law enforcement authorities to get cooperation from internet service providers," both in terms of identifying individuals and in the removal of offending material.

The new European laws do not as yet cover the filtering out of terrorism-related material by ISPs, but this is another area where the UK may blaze the trail. Home Secretary Jacqui Smith proposed something along these lines at the beginning of this year. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.