Feeds

The iPhone learns to read

Let your fingers do the writing

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Apple's iPhone can now understand hand-written letters, after an application initially developed to allow input of Chinese characters was tweaked to make it understand English.

The application is very much an alpha release, and users are advised to take backups before installing. Once installed it offers an interface that will be familiar to Palm users, but operated with a finger rather than a stylus.

The first PDA with handwriting recognition, and arguably the first PDA, also used a finger to trace out letters. Using its "Screen-Write System" the Casio PF-8000 managed to recognise letters some 25 years ago - more or less. Since then no one has considered a finger to be a useful writing tool, and styli quickly became the standard for any recognition system.

But inputing Chinese is more of a challenge, and while Chinese youth have proved adept in utilising short-cuts to make T9-like techniques usable (careful to whom you send the number "520") handwriting recognition is much more popular amongst users of logographic languages.

None of this should be a problem for the iPhone, which isn't officially available in China or any markets where non-Latin-based characters are used. But the fact someone has developed such an application is indicative of just how popular the handset is - even when there's no official support for it. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.