Feeds

US law makers seek ban on in-flight calls

'Noisome disruption in search of further revenue'

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A group of US congressmen have introduced legislation which would ban the use of mobile phones on US aircraft, attempting to "ensure a relative amount of peace for the American public as they take to an increasingly crowded sky".

The particularly stupidly-named HANG UP Act (Halting Airplane Noise to Give Us Peace) seeks to ban the use of mobile phones for voice calls. Ridiculously overpriced seat-back-mounted handsets would still be allowed, and passengers could send and receive text messages, as well as accessing the internet via their mobile.

The group quotes figures that have 63 per cent of Americans against the use of mobiles on planes. "Polls show that the American public is strongly opposed to allowing cell phone use in-flight," said Jerry Costello, one of the four congressmen who are all members of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. "The HANG UP Act will make sure it does not happen."

Peter DeFazio, the act's primary sponsor, says: "Our bill... would ensure that financially-strapped airlines don’t drive us towards this noisome disruption in search of further revenue."

The group also plays the safety card, claiming that flight attendants will have to break up fights between those making calls and those forced to listen to them - not to mention that passengers will miss important safety announcements.

The problem with consulting the public is that everyone is against using mobile phones on aircraft, unless they have an important call to make.

For politicians this kind of legislation is great, however - it has a near-zero chance of becoming law, allowing them to look as though they're fighting for public rights while actually doing nothing at all. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Redmond resists order to hand over overseas email
Court wanted peek as related to US investigation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.