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Stuff yourself silly with Nintendo's Wii

Face stuffing fun?

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The Wii has been linked to numerous claims that it’s helped people lose weight. But now the console could help people get fatter - virtually, at least - thanks to the impending release of Major League Eating: The Game.

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Major League Eating: The Game - stuff yourself silly

Competitive eating is quite an... er… sport over in the US, and the videogame sees players attempt to stuff as much grub as they can into their pixellated pie-holes, in the shortest possible time. Every fatty food group is included, including hotdogs and pizza.

The obvious advantage of stuffing your face virtually in a videogame is that you won't put on any pounds, don’t have to pay for the food and don't have to learn the Heimlich manoeuvre in case someone chokes.

Mastiff, the game’s distributor, is currently on tour with the game in the US and is tempting people to have a go with the promise of free food. For example, a San Francisco man recently downed 141 sushi rolls as part of the PR stunt.

Major League Eating: The Game will be released in the US on 12 May, but a European release date hasn’t been served up yet.

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