Feeds

VIA and Nvidia partner to bomb Intel's Atom

Fusion of interests

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Under pressure from Intel's Atom, chip makers VIA and Nvidia have apparently agreed that their interests should undergo fusion, and have agreed to brings their respective processors and integrated chipsets into orbit around each other.

Dodgy particle physics metaphors aside, the deal - motherboard makers moles allege - is about competing more effectively with Intel's Atom and Centrino Atom products, respectively aimed at sub-notebooks and handheld internet devices.

Maxdata Belinea s.book 1

VIA's C7-M based Nanobook

VIA has been trying to grab the market for some time, pitching its low-power C7-M processor at the so-called Netbook category. A year or so back, it began pitching a Netbook reference design, the Nanobook, to computer makers.

It's had some success: Packard Bell, Maxdata, SungJut and Everex - to name but four - have all released machines in the last 12 months based on the Nanobook design.

And this week, HP announced its entry into the market: the C7-M based 2133 Mini-Note, though it's not a Nanobook-derived product.

Having tried one out - Maxdata's Belinea s.book 1, reviewed here - we think VIA will struggle against Atom. The 1.2GHz C7-M, we found, wasn't as fast as the 900MHz Celeron M used in the Eee PC yet runs rather hotter, causing the unit's cooling fan to kick in too frequently for our taste. It's hard to see it putting up much resistance to the 45nm Netbook-oriented 'Diamondville' Atom, but we'll reserve judgement until Atom's out, in June.

Nvidia, meanwhile, doesn't want Atom to become the de facto standard for Netbooks and handhelds the way Centrino has for laptops, so is presumably keen to ally itself with the chip giant's main competitor in the sector.

VIA has its own graphics chip operation, S3, but we're sure it wouldn't say no to an alliance with a much stronger graphics brand.

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Apple gets patent for WRIST-PUTER: iTime for a smartwatch
It does everything a smartwatch should do ... but Apple owns it
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.