Feeds

Phishers offer credit card discounts to prospective marks

In-SecureCode

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Phishing fraudsters are using promises of financial discounts to trick unwary users into handing over their credit card details.

Scam emails that form the basis of the fraud claim to be part of MasterCard's SecureCode scheme. Con men are attempting to exploit a lack of familiarity with the recently introduced programme, which ironically promises to offer greater security to credit card transactions.

Phishing emails attempt to lure prospective marks into "signing up" to SecureCode, by offering a 16 per cent discount on future purchases made with the card. More typically, phishing campaigns ask users to confirm details for maintenance purposes or due to database corruption.

In reality, users that click on the link contained within the email are redirected to a phishing site, set up to look almost identical to the genuine MasterCard website. Visitors are then asked to supply confidential information including credit card expiration date, date of birth, and the three digit security code located on the back of the card - enough information for the cybercriminals to abuse the compromised account themselves and sell on the details through the underground black market.

The scam emails were intercepted by net security firm Sophos.

"MasterCard has been very successful in positioning SecureCode as the answer to online fraud, and with so many computer users growing increasingly worried about the risks of shopping online, the prospect of greater security and money off can be too much to resist," said Carole Theriault, senior security consultant at Sophos.

"Computer users must be wary of simply clicking on links in unsolicited emails and should take time to verify the site address first - it may take a little longer, but will protect your money and identity from preying cybercriminals in the long run. Also, everyone needs to use a little common sense - if it seems too good to be true, it probably is," she added. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.