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Guitar maker Gibson thrashes out more robo-axes

Self-tuning to replace roadies?

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'Leccy guitar pioneer Gibson has unveiled two additional automated strummers in its self-tuning Robot line.

gibson_robots_lespaul

Gibson's Robot Les Paul Studio

The Gibson Robot Les Paul Studio and Gibson Robot SG Special build on the success of the Limited Edition Gibson Robot Guitar, which was released late last year. The manufacturer claims demand has been so overwhelming that it decided to create two more of the self-tuning designs.

Although neither model will instantly turn you into a Guitar Hero, the system will at least ensure your strings are in tune. The design, which took over ten years to develop, relies on special pick-ups underneath the guitar’s strings that control a mechanism for adjusting each string's tension to keep it vibrating at the correct pitch.

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Gibson's Robot SG Special

Digital signal processing identifies the frequency of each string as it’s strummed, and a software algorithm then compares that sound to the one each string’s supposed to make.

The software then sends commands down each string to small motors that tighten and loosen the strings accordingly. This ensures each string always hits the correct note – no matter how bad the guitarist’s playing is.

Both of Gibson’s latest model’s will be available in a metallic purple colour, but for a limited time only. So far, Gibson has only announced availability in the US, where the Les Paul costs $4000 (£2000/€2200) and the SG costs $3600 (£1800/€2000).

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