Feeds

IBM offers 4,000 frequent flyer miles per core to abandon HP

Dump a Superdome. Go to the Bahamas

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Oh, baby. IBM is hitting its "move off HP and Sun" program harder than Amy Winehouse hits a crack pipe.

During a launch event today for new Power servers, IBM reminded customers and press again and again and again about its pay-to-port effort. IBM will hand customers up to $4,000 per core if they shift from a rival box to one of IBM's Unix systems. So, junking a 128-core HP Superdome will bring in $512,000.

The payments, however, arrive via IBM's version of funny money. Customers must direct the credits toward the purchase of software or services from IBM. And, according to our reading of IBM's material, the software and services are tied to processes involved with migrating off the rival gear.

It's unclear if the porting payout can also be used to cover dough nut supplies for the Global Services team's visit.

"It is kind of a frequent flyer system for the IT industry," said IBM systems chief Bill Zeitler.

(We assume then that this means you can only use the software and services points from October 12-17 during leap years.)

You can tell that IBM really has it in for HP, since it's offering the frequent flyer super saver deal at $4,000 - 4,000 points - per PA-RISC core. Meanwhile, Alpha, SPARC, Itanium and even SGI MIPS (What? Now that's just mean - Ed) customers must settle for $1,000 per core.

IBM, HP and Sun have long had similar programs in place to woo each others' customers, although IBM appears awful aggressive now that it's rounded out the Power6-based server line. The company claims to have stolen helped 1,000 Sun and HP customers move over to Power in the last two years. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.