Feeds

Australia to restrict laser-pointers - Minister

Pry my presentational aid from my cold dead fingers

The Power of One Infographic

Australia will move to restrict imports of powerful laser pointers which have recently been used in dazzling attacks against airline pilots coming in to land.

The Aussie government may also regulate ownership of such lasers more heavily, in a manner similar to the way it treats firearms.

"There are legitimate uses for devices that are used by surveyors and astronomers, for instance, but we will be putting heavy restrictions on the importation of the kind of lasers that have been used in these recent attacks," said Home Affairs Minister Bob Debus yesterday. Debus was speaking to ABC.

"Recent attacks on pilots have highlighted the seriousness of the problem. It's destructive, dangerous behavior which needs a coordinated response across Australia."

Debus is believed to be referring to green laser pointers, some of which give out a more powerful beam than ordinary red ones. There has been a rash of such attacks against commercial aircraft in Australia, including one last week in which six airliners approaching Sydney were compelled to alter their landing plans due to green lasers shining from the Bexley area.

Debus has previously said that the lasers could become subject to the same kind of regulations as firearms. According to Aussie civil-aviation spokesmen, five or six laser attacks are reported every week.

Such harassment has also occurred in the States, causing angry feds to read the Patriot Act at photon-squirting miscreants there. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Sit back down, Julian Assange™, you're not going anywhere just yet
Swedish court refuses to withdraw arrest warrant
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
British cops cuff 660 suspected paedophiles
Arrests people allegedly accessing child abuse images online
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.