Feeds

UK.gov will force paedophiles to register email addresses

Can anyone spot a flaw in this law?

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

"Wacky" Jacqui Smith, the Home Secretary, will today unveil plans to jail paedophiles who supply police with false email details, or fail to declare new addresses they register.

The idea is already being labelled unworkable, but is set to form part of a suite of measures aimed at improving child safety online. The penalty for registered sex offenders who give dodgy details or lurk on social networking sites will be up to five years' jail time.

The new laws will come into force later this year, and will cover the 30,000 people on the sex offenders' register. They are already required to keep police updated with their physical address, travel plans and other details.

The plan is that sites popular with children, such as Bebo and MySpace, will have access to the list of paedophiles' email addresses and block attempts to sign up. The ready availability of anonymous email addresses from Gmail, Hotmail and dozens of other providers would seem to suggest that only the most stupid offender will be caught out by this.

Wacky Jacqui has form for demanding the moon on a stick from technology. Earlier this month she insisted that the ID card system will be impossible to hack because "none of the databases will be online". In January she blundered into the issue of online extremism, demonstrating a fairly fundamental misunderstanding of the structure of the internet. "Where there is illegal material on the net, I want it removed," she demanded.

Advance copies of the speech Smith will make today, sent to the press, said: "We have some of the strictest controls on sex offenders in the world to protect our children.

"We are working together with police, industry and charities to create a hostile environment for sex offenders on the internet, and are determined to make it as hard for predators to strike online as in the real world."

The announcements come in the wake of the Byron Review of technology's impact on children, published last week. It suggested new safety guidelines for websites and parents, which the government has adopted as policy. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.