Feeds

Danish ISP bundles free music subscription

But there's a catch

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

TDC, Denmark's biggest ISP, is bundling a free music service with its broadband offering. And no, it's not a 1 April story - as we'll see from the caveats.

While the service, PLAY, offers songs from three of the four biggest labels, it's not a "legal P2P file-sharing" service of the kind we so often discuss here.

The songs will be shackled with DRM and expire after 30 days if the customer leaves the ISP. While this may allay big label concerns about the "Homer Simpson Factor" inherent in all-you-can-eat subscription services, it fails to provide supply-side incentives, or commercially exploit our desire to share music.

"You can't have a subscription model where somebody on a monthly model of say $10, goes on in January, downloads six million tracks, and leaves in February," IFPI chairman told John Kennedy earlier this year.

However, with DRM the consumer has no incentive to share songs, which under a system such as PlayLouder MSP positively rewards the copyright holder, providing an economic incentive to create and promote music.

So while the price is right, it's more of a threat to commercial music "stores" such as iTunes and Amazon, and rival subscription services such as eMusic, than it is to unlicensed P2P.

In contast to the independent labels and collection societies, the major labels have thwarted bundled music services. In June 2006 Tiscali was forced to pull an on-demand streaming service called Jukebox, based on software from "P2P radio" startup Mercora (now Social.FM). Tiscali had won the support of Società Consortile Fonografici (the Italian equivalent of our PPL). And all four major labels have shunned the DRM-free eMusic service, which claims number two spot in the US digital music market, despite the arrival of Amazon.

The world's biggest label, Universal, continues to go its own way - striking its own opaque deals with telecoms and consumer electronics companies (for example, Nokia) which leave creators' representatives puzzled. EMI, Warner, and Sony BMG are participating in TDC's Play, but Universal is not. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?